SEPTEMBER 17 - 18
HAVENER CENTER - ROLLA, MO
further. faster.

This overview of the schedule shows the general flow for the event. Note that there may be other events occuring throughout the sessions and workshops; details on all events will be added to the calendar below as they are set. Events and times subject to change.

Saturday & Sunday

Separate registration required. Learn more and register here.

8am

Data Carpentry Day 1 - Genomics

Workshop

8h

Dan Voss, at Florida State University

Melissa Cragin, Executive Director, Midwest Big Data Hub at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Yee Mey Seah, Research Associate at University of Washington Bothell


Learn more and register at https://goo.gl/VjtQ4N.

Data Carpentry’s aim is to teach researchers basic concepts, skills, and tools for working with data so that they can get more done in less time, and with less pain. This workshop teaches data management and analysis for genomics research including: best practices for organization of bioinformatics projects and data, use of command line utilities, use of command line tools to analyze sequence quality and perform variant calling, and connecting to and using cloud computing. This lesson assumes no prior experience with the tools covered in the workshop. However, learners are expected to have some familiarity with biological concepts, including nucleotide abbreviations and the concept of genomic variation within a population. Participants should bring their laptops and plan to participate actively.

8am

Data Carpentry Day 2 - Genomics

Workshop

8h

Dan Voss, at Florida State University

Melissa Cragin, Executive Director, Midwest Big Data Hub at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Yee Mey Seah, Research Associate at University of Washington Bothell


Learn more and register at https://goo.gl/VjtQ4N.

Data Carpentry’s aim is to teach researchers basic concepts, skills, and tools for working with data so that they can get more done in less time, and with less pain. This workshop teaches data management and analysis for genomics research including: best practices for organization of bioinformatics projects and data, use of command line utilities, use of command line tools to analyze sequence quality and perform variant calling, and connecting to and using cloud computing. This lesson assumes no prior experience with the tools covered in the workshop. However, learners are expected to have some familiarity with biological concepts, including nucleotide abbreviations and the concept of genomic variation within a population. Participants should bring their laptops and plan to participate actively.

Monday

8:30am

Registration

1h


Come say hello and pick up your conference materials! See us on the second floor of the Havener Center atrium.

9:30am

Faster Science with Parallel Programming

HPC

2h

David Apostal, PhD. Candidate in Scientific Computing - Department of Computer Science at University of North Dakota


Need to convert a serial program to a parallel application? Eager to learn about parallel programming? In this workshop you will learn keys to unlocking runtime performance on modern computers. Guided exercises will show different methods to parallelize code and how to measure application speedup. Topics to be covered include vectorization, OpenMP, and more.

9:30am

Deploying Remote Sensing

Remote Sensing

2h

Paul Snyder, Assistant Professor, Department of Aviation at University of North Dakota

Colin Lee, Project Manager at Minnesota Department of Transportation


Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) is enabling MnDOT to acquire high quality aerial data of in a timely and cost effective manner. This workshop cover the steps of map production using drone data, including mission planning, data acquisition, georeferencing, elevation modeling, orthophoto generation, topographic and planimetric mapping, and quality control. See firsthand what the data deliverables consist of and how the data are used in mapping applications.

9:30am

Onboarding to Advanced: Supporting AR/VR Technology at University Scale

Visualization

2h

Chauncey Frend, at Indiana University UITS Advanced Visualization Lab


The IU Advanced Visualization Lab (AVL) has served the IU community’s needs for AR/VR technology systems and services for 21 years. Across IU’s nine campuses students, faculty members, and staff require a range of serviceable AR/VR solutions to meet modern scholarly goals. To create the opportunity for onboarding VR technology the AVL sustains “Reality Labs” as part of a distributed visualization initiative. Reality Labs are specifically focused on adding VR capable, “Reality Stations”, to open access computer labs already established in highly utilized areas. Moreover, AVL staff work directly with research and teaching individuals seeking more unique AR/VR solutions. This presentation will highlight insights that we have developed, and specific examples of unique AR/VR solutions adopted by IU users.

1:15pm

Big Data, Visualization, and UAS at Grand Sky

Keynote

1h

Dave Hambleton, Program Manager for the Autonomous Systems Division at Northrop Grumman


An overview of the Northrop Grumman approach to dealing with the challenges of big data and visualization within the defense and security UAS market, with a focus on its new Autonomous Capability Center at Grand Sky, North Dakota.

2:30pm

Airspace Access and Remote Sensing Needs

Remote Sensing

50m

Mark Askelson, Executive Director, Research Institute for Autonomous Systems at University of North Dakota


Integrating remote sensing platforms and Unmanned Aircraft Systems to conform to FAA Rules and Regulations on Airspace Access.

2:30pm

Supercomputing in Plain English

HPC

50m

Henry Neeman, Assistant Vice President for Information Technology - Research Strategy Advisor at University of Oklahoma


What the heck is supercomputing? Who uses supercomputing, how, and why? How does supercomputing work? What does the explosive growth of computing power mean for students, faculty and professionals? How can you use your graphics card to turn your laptop into a supercomputer? In this talk, you'll learn everything important about supercomputing, with nothing left out.

2:30pm

Visualization at University of Arkansas-Little Rock

Visualization

50m

Carolina Cruz-Neira, Director of the Emerging Analytics Center at University of Arkansas-Little Rock


3:30pm

Data Visualization with the Microsoft Hololens: A Workshop in VR-Enhanced Three- Dimensional Network Analysis.

Visualization

50m

Tim Pasch, Associate Professor - Department of Communication at University of North Dakota

Xun Zhu, Assistant Professor - Department of Communication at University of North Dakota


Visualizing social networks is an effective way to explore the pattern of the relationships among individuals. Traditional methods of visualization display networks in a two-dimensional space, with limited opportunities for users to explore the data and pertinent information unobtrusively. Mixed-reality technology revolutionizes the way users interact with large-scale network data. In this talk, we will begin with an overview of Hololens, a mixed-reality headset developed by Microsoft. Then we will demonstrate how Hololens enables users to immerse themselves in three-dimensional networks, and manipulate data with simple hand gestures. We will also discuss challenges of drawing data-driven inferences with mixed-reality technology.

3:30pm

Using Drones for Infrastructure Inspection

Remote Sensing

50m

Zachery Waller, Research Coordinator & Asst. Professor - UND Department of Aviation at University of North Dakota

Paul Snyder, Assistant Professor, Department of Aviation at University of North Dakota


Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) have been demonstrated as a valuable new tool in the inspection and maintenance of electrical power transmission and distribution lines. In collaboration with the University of North Dakota, private sector power transmission and utility supply chain solution providers work to advance both synoptic survey of the right-of-way and point inspections of specific infrastructure. This presentation will examine data produced by sUAS and the methods supporting its collection.

4:30pm

Constructing with Visualization

Visualization

50m

Doug Snider, Virtual Design and Construction Coordinator at Leopardo Companies, Inc.


Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a graphical simulation of the components and data of a building construction project related to specific building elements, location and schedule. It allows the fragmented information typical in building documentation to be centralized and shared by the project team. However, the utility of this data can be constrained because of its isolation within the BIM system. This talk presents a real-world exploration of the integration of the emerging technologies of reality capture, virtual reality and augmented reality as tools of liberating information from building models at the location and time of implementation. The creation of a Mixed Reality Information Model allows for real-time, on site and virtual presence collaboration with physical and virtual building elements and their associated information and enables tracking outcomes of collaboration back to the centralized Building Information Model. A Mixed Reality Building Information Model poses exciting possibilities for construction visualization, trade coordination, and quality tracking, but also contains challenges of technological literacy and data ownership and liability.

4:30pm

Grant Proposals 101

HPC

50m

Henry Neeman, Assistant Vice President for Information Technology - Research Strategy Advisor at University of Oklahoma


Do you want to write grant proposals for your research (or research infrastructure), or to write better grant proposals, or to help others write their grant proposals better?
In this session, we'll look at not only the components of a grant proposal and how to craft them, but also how to think like the people who are going to decide whether to give you that grant, so that you can anticipate their concerns and address them effectively.

4:30pm

Winds of Change - Using Drones to Sense the Weather and Improve Forecasting

Remote Sensing

50m

Jamey Jacob, Director of Unmanned Systems Research Institute at Oklahoma State University


Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) have been proposed for use in a number of areas outside of traditional reconnaissance, including agriculture and infrastructure modeling. Additional civilian applications that are being explored include weather and wildfire monitoring. Researchers at OSU have partnered with NOAA and the National Severe Storms Laboratory to develop and use UAS to help increase our understanding of tornado genesis with the goal of increasing the forecasting capability and warning time of severe storms and deadly tornados. While the primary goal is to take measurements that will increase our knowledge of how these storms form, they will also track cyclones as they develop. This will provide information currently only obtainable by storm chasers who put themselves directly in the path of the storm. Future use of UAS will enhance storm-chasing capabilities while allowing the chasers to maintain a safe distance from the storm. The same systems can be used to search for survivors after a storm and perform immediate post-tornado damage assessment. UAS can also be used to obtain data from wildfires to develop better computational models to predict how fires form and behave. These models will help us understand how fires evolve to allow emergency services to contact residents and businesses that may be located in the path of the fire, saving lives and property. This talk explores some of the work currently being done in these areas and how it will impact air travel and weather forecasting. It will also discuss recent developments in implementation of unmanned traffic management (UTM) systems, particularly as part of the FAA’s UAS Integration Pilot Program.

5:30pm

Street Party Social

Social

2h 30m


Do you want to enjoy the culinary delight of chef prepared farm-to-food truck grub? Or sample award winning local wine and beer from the people who create it? This year's Street Party Social is shaping up to be the best ever. Come out on Monday night and enjoy all this and great music, networking and the biggest fireworks show in RTD history. Bring your RTD badge as it is your ticket to the party.

8pm

Fireworks

Fireworks

20m


Tuesday

8:30am

Keynote

Keynote

1h


9:45am

Breakout Session

Remote Sensing

50m


9:45am

Midwest Big Data Hub - Data Science Student Poster Session

HPC

50m

Aaron Bergstrom, Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Manager at University of North Dakota


The Midwest Big Data Hub invites students from across the US to present their data science work as a research poster. Submit poster title and abstract by email to "Aaron.Bergstrom@und.edu". Posters should be 30"x40". Foam backerboard, easels, and push pins will be provided. Presenters will be notified once their poster has been accepted for inclusion in the session. Travel support is available for up to 10 students with accepted posters.

10:45am

Breakout Session

Remote Sensing

50m


10:45am

Breakout Session

Visualization

50m