SEPTEMBER 17 - 18
HAVENER CENTER - ROLLA, MO
further. faster.

This overview of the schedule shows the general flow for the event. Note that there may be other events occuring throughout the sessions and workshops; details on all events will be added to the calendar below as they are set. Events and times subject to change.

Saturday & Sunday

Separate registration required. Learn more and register here.

8am

Data Carpentry Day 1 - Genomics

Meramec/Gasconade Room

Workshop

8h

Dan Voss, Florida State University

Yee Mey Seah, Research Associate at University of Washington Bothell

Fred Boehm


Learn more and register at https://goo.gl/VjtQ4N.

Data Carpentry’s aim is to teach researchers basic concepts, skills, and tools for working with data so that they can get more done in less time, and with less pain. This workshop teaches data management and analysis for genomics research including: best practices for organization of bioinformatics projects and data, use of command line utilities, use of command line tools to analyze sequence quality and perform variant calling, and connecting to and using cloud computing. This lesson assumes no prior experience with the tools covered in the workshop. However, learners are expected to have some familiarity with biological concepts, including nucleotide abbreviations and the concept of genomic variation within a population. Participants should bring their laptops and plan to participate actively.

8am

Data Carpentry Day 2 - Genomics

Meramec/Gasconade Room

Workshop

8h

Dan Voss, Florida State University

Yee Mey Seah, Research Associate at University of Washington Bothell

Fred Boehm


Learn more and register at https://goo.gl/VjtQ4N.

Data Carpentry’s aim is to teach researchers basic concepts, skills, and tools for working with data so that they can get more done in less time, and with less pain. This workshop teaches data management and analysis for genomics research including: best practices for organization of bioinformatics projects and data, use of command line utilities, use of command line tools to analyze sequence quality and perform variant calling, and connecting to and using cloud computing. This lesson assumes no prior experience with the tools covered in the workshop. However, learners are expected to have some familiarity with biological concepts, including nucleotide abbreviations and the concept of genomic variation within a population. Participants should bring their laptops and plan to participate actively.

Monday

8:30am

Registration

Havener Center - Second Floor

1h


Come say hello and pick up your conference materials! See us on the second floor of the Havener Center atrium.

9:30am

Faster Science with Parallel Programming

Turner Room

HPC

2h

David Apostal, PhD. Candidate in Scientific Computing - Department of Computer Science at University of North Dakota


Need to convert a serial program to a parallel application? Eager to learn about parallel programming? In this workshop you will learn keys to unlocking runtime performance on modern computers. Guided exercises will show different methods to parallelize code and how to measure application speedup. Topics to be covered include vectorization, OpenMP, and more.

9:30am

Deploying Remote Sensing

Ozark Room

Remote Sensing

2h

Paul Snyder, Assistant Professor, Department of Aviation at University of North Dakota

Colin Lee, Project Manager at Minnesota Department of Transportation


Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) is enabling MnDOT to acquire high quality aerial data of in a timely and cost effective manner. This workshop cover the steps of map production using drone data, including mission planning, data acquisition, georeferencing, elevation modeling, orthophoto generation, topographic and planimetric mapping, and quality control. See firsthand what the data deliverables consist of and how the data are used in mapping applications.

9:30am

Onboarding to Advanced: Supporting AR/VR Technology at University Scale

Carver Room

Visualization

2h

Chauncey Frend, Indiana University UITS Advanced Visualization Lab


The IU Advanced Visualization Lab (AVL) has served the IU community’s needs for AR/VR technology systems and services for 21 years. Across IU’s nine campuses students, faculty members, and staff require a range of serviceable AR/VR solutions to meet modern scholarly goals. To create the opportunity for onboarding VR technology the AVL sustains “Reality Labs” as part of a distributed visualization initiative. Reality Labs are specifically focused on adding VR capable, “Reality Stations”, to open access computer labs already established in highly utilized areas. Moreover, AVL staff work directly with research and teaching individuals seeking more unique AR/VR solutions. This presentation will highlight insights that we have developed, and specific examples of unique AR/VR solutions adopted by IU users.

9:30am

Raspberry Pi and ESP8266: A beginner's guide to interacting with the world using microcontrollers

Missouri Room

Workshop

2h

Don Howdeshell, Software Developer & Systems Administrator at Missouri University of Science & Technology


This session has a capacity of 30 people and separate registration will be required. Attendees will have a chance to enter a drawing to win one of several Raspberry Pi 3 B+ boards. Read the requirements and register here: https://libcal.mst.edu/event/4567235

 

The Raspberry Pi 3 and the ESP8266 are very capable development boards, but how can one utilize all of their features?  In this session, Don Howdeshell will walk through all of the features of both the Pi and the ESP. We will cover hardware and software, SPI, I2C, UART, and much more.  This session is geared toward beginners and intermediate users of the systems. You will leave with a firm foundation of knowledge on which you can start designing and building your own "Internet of Things" (IoT) devices that can interact with the real world.

9:30am

ShowMeCI Working Session

Meramec/Gasconade Room

2h

BJ Lougee, Facilitator

Timothy Middelkoop, Co-Facilitator


Will have a working session on the technical aspect for allowing the sharing of resources between the members of ShowMeCI.
Main topic of interest is federated identity management.

11:30am

Lunch and Welcome to RTD

St. Pat's Ballroom

1h 45m


1:15pm

Big Data, Visualization, and UAS at Grand Sky

St. Pat's Ballroom

Keynote

1h

Dave Hambleton, Program Manager for the Autonomous Systems Division at Northrop Grumman


An overview of the Northrop Grumman approach to dealing with the challenges of big data and visualization within the defense and security UAS market, with a focus on its new Autonomous Capability Center at Grand Sky, North Dakota.

2:30pm

Airspace Access and Remote Sensing Needs

Ozark Room

Remote Sensing

50m

Mark Askelson, Executive Director, Research Institute for Autonomous Systems at University of North Dakota


Integrating remote sensing platforms and Unmanned Aircraft Systems to conform to FAA Rules and Regulations on Airspace Access.

2:30pm

Supercomputing in Plain English

Turner Room

HPC

50m

Henry Neeman, Assistant Vice President for Information Technology - Research Strategy Advisor at University of Oklahoma


What the heck is supercomputing? Who uses supercomputing, how, and why? How does supercomputing work? What does the explosive growth of computing power mean for students, faculty and professionals? How can you use your graphics card to turn your laptop into a supercomputer? In this talk, you'll learn everything important about supercomputing, with nothing left out.

2:30pm

Virtual Reality V2.0: Opportunities and Challenges

Carver Room

Visualization

50m

Carolina Cruz-Neira, Director of the Emerging Analytics Center at University of Arkansas-Little Rock


This talk will provide an in-depth overview of the current technologies available to create compelling immersive experiences to users while also giving a historical perspective of the many accomplishments and innovative ideas that virtual reality (VR) has enabled for the past 30 years. The goal is for attendees to have a broader understanding of the field of VR beyond what is portrayed by the current media and identify areas and markets in which VR can be a viable opportunity as well as the type of VR that may be the best fit for that opportunity. This field has been capturing the imagination of professionals as well as the public for over thirty years, and although now the technology is affordable and accessible, a great body of innovative work has been done over those years. The talk will present a wide range of VR projects that are deployed and in use in many industry sectors and research fields, discussing the process to introduce VR into workflows and the benefits as well as the challenges of using VR as a tool in industry and research.

2:30pm

Creating IoT Devices with the Raspberry Pi

Missouri Room

Workshop

50m

Don Howdeshell, Software Developer & Systems Administrator at Missouri University of Science & Technology


This session has a capacity of 30 people and separate registration will be required. Attendees will have a chance to enter a drawing to win one of several Raspberry Pi 3 B+ boards. Read the requirements and register here: https://libcal.mst.edu/event/4567236

 

This session is a follow-up on the Raspberry Pi introduction workshop.  Starting from a base knowledge of the Pi, we will cover several important concepts necessary to create useful and secure IoT devices. Learn how to get the Pi talking to a variety of sensors, switches, and other modules.

3:30pm

Data Visualization with the Microsoft Hololens: A Workshop in VR-Enhanced Three- Dimensional Network Analysis.

Carver Room

Visualization

50m

Tim Pasch, Associate Professor - Department of Communication at University of North Dakota

Xun Zhu, Assistant Professor - Department of Communication at University of North Dakota


Visualizing social networks is an effective way to explore the pattern of the relationships among individuals. Traditional methods of visualization display networks in a two-dimensional space, with limited opportunities for users to explore the data and pertinent information unobtrusively. Mixed-reality technology revolutionizes the way users interact with large-scale network data. In this talk, we will begin with an overview of Hololens, a mixed-reality headset developed by Microsoft. Then we will demonstrate how Hololens enables users to immerse themselves in three-dimensional networks, and manipulate data with simple hand gestures. We will also discuss challenges of drawing data-driven inferences with mixed-reality technology.

3:30pm

Using Drones for Infrastructure Inspection

Meramec/Gasconade Room

Remote Sensing

50m

Zachery Waller, Research Coordinator & Asst. Professor - UND Department of Aviation at University of North Dakota

Paul Snyder, Assistant Professor, Department of Aviation at University of North Dakota


Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) have been demonstrated as a valuable new tool in the inspection and maintenance of electrical power transmission and distribution lines. In collaboration with the University of North Dakota, private sector power transmission and utility supply chain solution providers work to advance both synoptic survey of the right-of-way and point inspections of specific infrastructure. This presentation will examine data produced by sUAS and the methods supporting its collection.

3:30pm

Winds of Change - Using Drones to Sense the Weather and Improve Forecasting

Turner Room

Remote Sensing

50m

Jamey Jacob, Director of Unmanned Systems Research Institute at Oklahoma State University


Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) have been proposed for use in a number of areas outside of traditional reconnaissance, including agriculture and infrastructure modeling. Additional civilian applications that are being explored include weather and wildfire monitoring. Researchers at OSU have partnered with NOAA and the National Severe Storms Laboratory to develop and use UAS to help increase our understanding of tornado genesis with the goal of increasing the forecasting capability and warning time of severe storms and deadly tornados. While the primary goal is to take measurements that will increase our knowledge of how these storms form, they will also track cyclones as they develop. This will provide information currently only obtainable by storm chasers who put themselves directly in the path of the storm. Future use of UAS will enhance storm-chasing capabilities while allowing the chasers to maintain a safe distance from the storm. The same systems can be used to search for survivors after a storm and perform immediate post-tornado damage assessment. UAS can also be used to obtain data from wildfires to develop better computational models to predict how fires form and behave. These models will help us understand how fires evolve to allow emergency services to contact residents and businesses that may be located in the path of the fire, saving lives and property. This talk explores some of the work currently being done in these areas and how it will impact air travel and weather forecasting. It will also discuss recent developments in implementation of unmanned traffic management (UTM) systems, particularly as part of the FAA’s UAS Integration Pilot Program.

3:30pm

Python for Machine Learning at TACC

Ozark Room

HPC

50m

Amit Gupta, Research Engineering/Scientist Associate IV at Texas Advanced Computing Center


This talk will give an overview of Pythons capabilities for Machine Learning tasks with special emphasis on TACC Supercomputers. We will cover features of popular Python packages relevant to Data Analysis & Machine Learning such as NumPy, SciPy,  Pandas, Scikit-Learn and visualizing library MatplotLib. We will show demos of each of these on TACC systems with the use of Jupyter notebooks. We will also briefly touch upon an overview of TACCs various in-depth trainings in these areas.

 

3:30pm

Increasing your funding success rate. Work smarter, not harder.

St. Pat's Ballroom

Workshop

50m

Angela Lueking Ph.D, Expert/Consultant and Former Program Director at National Science Foundation.


The talk will highlight insights learned from being a program director at the National Science Foundation and overview strategies and common mistakes in proposal writing.

4:30pm

Constructing with Visualization

Carver Room

Visualization

50m

Doug Snider, Virtual Design and Construction Coordinator at Leopardo Companies, Inc.


Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a graphical simulation of the components and data of a building construction project related to specific building elements, location and schedule. It allows the fragmented information typical in building documentation to be centralized and shared by the project team. However, the utility of this data can be constrained because of its isolation within the BIM system. This talk presents a real-world exploration of the integration of the emerging technologies of reality capture, virtual reality and augmented reality as tools of liberating information from building models at the location and time of implementation. The creation of a Mixed Reality Information Model allows for real-time, on site and virtual presence collaboration with physical and virtual building elements and their associated information and enables tracking outcomes of collaboration back to the centralized Building Information Model. A Mixed Reality Building Information Model poses exciting possibilities for construction visualization, trade coordination, and quality tracking, but also contains challenges of technological literacy and data ownership and liability.

4:30pm

Midwest Big Data Hub - Data Science Student Poster Session

Ozark Room

HPC

50m

Aaron Bergstrom, Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Manager at University of North Dakota

Melissa Cragin, Executive Director, Midwest Big Data Hub at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


The Midwest Big Data Hub invites students from across the US to present their data science work as a research poster. Submit poster title and abstract by email to "Aaron.Bergstrom@und.edu". Posters should be 30"x40". Foam backerboard, easels, and push pins will be provided. Presenters will be notified once their poster has been accepted for inclusion in the session. Travel support is available for up to 10 students with accepted posters.

 

Poster Presenters Include:

 

Allen, Kailyn – Minnesota State University Moorhead – Data Visualization as a Tool for Strengthening Equity, Digital Literacy, and Academic Achievement in Schools

Amici, David – Northwestern University – Integration of Cancer Dependency Data to Explore an HSF1 Coessentiality Network

Hasbargen, Adam – Minnesota State University Moorhead – Viability of Big Data Archiving on Cypherpunk Blockchains

Zeng, Winston – Basis Flagstaff Charter School – Effectiveness of Feature Extraction, Data Augmentation, and Fine-tuning with Pre-trained Models for Chest X-ray Image Classification

4:30pm

Is Machine Learning a New Paradigm for Remote Sensing?

Meramec/Gasconade Room

Remote Sensing

50m

Vasit Sagan, Director, Integrated Applied Sciences PhD/GIScience Masters Programs at Saint Louis University


Rapid advances in sensor technology, unmanned aerial systems (UAS), and machine learning have facilitated exponential growth of remote sensing applications. Computer vision, as a multidisciplinary field, seeks to mimic human visual system for automatic extraction, analysis, and interpreting useful information from images. On the other hand, machine learning, particularly deep learning offers promising analytical solutions for diverse fields of studies concerned with Big Data. This talk focuses on advancing research in computer vision and big data analytics for remote sensing applications to address the state-of-the-art technical and application challenges.

4:30pm

Panel: Tips on increasing your funding success rate.

St. Pat's Ballroom

Workshop

50m

Ming Leu, Keith and Pat Bailey Distinguished Professor, Director at Missouri S&T Intelligent Systems Center

Joel Burken Ph.D., P.E., BCEE, F. AEESP, Curators' Distinguished Professor & Chair at Missouri S&T Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Maciej Zawodniok, Associate Professor at Missouri S&T Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Shudipto Dishari Ph.D, Assistant Professor at University of Nebraska-Lincoln


Moderator:

Angela D. Lueking, Ph.D.

Expert Consultant and Former Program Director, National Science Foundation

5:30pm

Street Party Social

Havener Lawn

Social

2h 30m


Do you want to enjoy the culinary delight of chef prepared farm-to-food truck grub? Or sample award winning local wine and beer from the people who create it? This year's Street Party Social is shaping up to be the best ever. Come out on Monday night and enjoy all this and great music, networking and the biggest fireworks show in RTD history. Bring your RTD badge as it is your ticket to the party.

8pm

Fireworks

Havener Lawn

Fireworks

20m


Tuesday

8:30am

High Performance Computing at Los Alamos National Laboratory

St. Pat's Ballroom

Keynote

1h

Dave Morton, Group Leader of the HPC Design Group (DES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory


Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) High Performance Computing has a long and distinguished history over the last 70+ years. This talk will review the uses and capabilities of current and past HPC systems at LANL. A discussion of perceived future large HPC system challenges and potential remedies will then be presented.

9:45am

Anatomical Eyes: Introducing Virtual Reality in Education

Carver Room

Visualization

50m

Carolina Cruz-Neira, Director of the Emerging Analytics Center at University of Arkansas-Little Rock


Today there is a fundamental need to change medical education with innovative approaches that provide health care professionals with a wide range of hands-on anatomy experiences with a diversity of body types, diseases and conditions well beyond what can be obtain with traditional cadaver and wet labs. An excellent approach to address this need is to introduce virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR). Through VR/AR, we can give each student a “fresh” virtual body in which they can repeat the explorations as needed.

To that end, we have developed Anatomical Eyes, a VR/AR tool that enables health care professionals to explore the anatomy of the human body through individualized long lasting immersive experiences; to receive formal instruction through group immersive experiences; and to have access to an extensive variety of human bodies and abnormalities not possible with today’s practices. Our goal is to provide health care professionals with a tool that gives them sufficient breath and exposure to learn and understand a wide range of possible conditions to increase their hands-on experience prior to practice with actual patients.

Anatomical Eyes will be available as a demonstration that attendees can experience after the talk.

9:45am

Visualization of Scientific/Engineering Data Using Paraview

Ozark Room

Visualization

1h 50m

Greg Abram, Research Engineering/Science Associate V at Texas Advanced Computing Center


I will be giving a 2 hour session on the visualization of scientific and engineering data using Paraview. This will consist of a broad introduction to scientific visualization, a demonstration of Paraview’s interactive capabilities, a presentation on Paraview Python scripting, and an overview of using Paraview on the supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. Attendees are invited to steer the presentation in any direction desired. A hands-on workshop will be included; attendees are invited to install the latest version of Paraview (5.5.2) on their personal system and to bring their data.

9:45am

Creating IoT Devices with the ESP8266 microcontroller

Missouri Room

Workshop

50m

Don Howdeshell, Software Developer & Systems Administrator at Missouri University of Science & Technology


This session has a capacity of 30 people and separate registration will be required. Attendees will have a chance to enter a drawing to win one of several Raspberry Pi 3 B+ boards. Read the requirements and register here: https://libcal.mst.edu/event/4567237

 

This session is a follow-up on the ESP8266 introduction workshop.  Starting from a base knowledge of the ESP, we will cover several important concepts necessary to create useful and secure IoT devices. Learn how to get the ESP talking to connected sensors and the internet via Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). 

9:45am

Unmanned Aerial Systems 102

Turner Room

Remote Sensing

50m

Ryan McCarty, Aviation Safety Technician at Federal Aviation Administration

Phil Dixon, Safety Team Program Manager at Federal Aviation Administration


 Latest information from the FAA on UAS regulation.

10:45am

Scalable Photogrammetry: Experiences with an HPC Workflow

Carver Room

Visualization

50m

Esen Tuna, Technical Advisor and Manager of the Research Data Services at Indiana University

Eric Wernert, Director, Visualization and Analytics, Research Technologies, University Information Technology Services at Indiana University


In this presentation, we discuss a particular implementation of a high-performance photogrammetry service. Though the service is currently using a specific photogrammetry software package (PhotoScan by Agisoft), our system architecture is designed around a general photogrammetry process that can be easily adapted to leverage other photogrammetry tools. We report on our experience with the workflow and an extensive performance study that measured the relative impacts of dataset size, software quality settings, and processing cluster size. Furthermore, we share lessons learned that are useful both to users of photogrammetry, and to system administrators looking to establish a similar service. We describe and demonstrate the user-facing support components that are crucial for successful use of the service. Attendees are invited to bring a laptop if they would like to access demo material.

10:45am

Rapid UAS Design, Development, and Flight Testing - Lessons Learned

Turner Room

Remote Sensing

50m

Taylor Mitchell, Senior Research Engineer and Systems Development Lead at Oklahoma State University Unmanned Systems Research Institute


Over the past 20 years, Oklahoma State University has developed expertise and capabilities in the rapid design and development of unmanned aircraft, both rotary and fixed wing platforms. Typical timelines for design and flight testing of custom vehicles take from 1 to 6 months, depending on the system size and complexity. This talk explores the design, manufacturing, and flight test process for small unmanned aircraft systems up to 100 lbs and includes examples of both rotary and fixed wing platforms using electric, gasoline, and gas turbine engines for a variety of missions, including surveillance, environmental monitoring, and counter-UAS.